Notice: Undefined index: HTTP_ACCEPT_LANGUAGE in /var/www/qnundrum.com/includes/login.php on line 18 Role-playing in Fallout 76 is a dice roll
Ask A Question
0

Role-playing in Fallout 76 is a dice roll

Asked by mmocs on 12/03/2018 at 1:34 AM

Fallout 76 is a bit of a disaster, which is a shame because there are good ideas and good bits of content here. There wasn’t a single play session where I didn’t have a lot of fun, but there also wasn’t a session where something ridiculous didn’t cause frustration. It feels like it should have been released into early access as a work in progress for the next several months, thus alleviating some of the frustration from poor performance, bugs, and balancing issues. However, Bethesda opted to release Fallout 76 in a broken state, and this time I’m not laughing along about the bugs simply because we’ve come to accept them as a part of the Fallout franchise.

A lot of my appreciation manifests in the game’s weird events and creature variety. As Polygon video producer Jenna Stoeber notes, “[Fallout 76] rewards my aimless wandering with bizarre and imaginative sights, not to mention strange and impossible creatures. The game is set in West Virginia, but it takes place in a nightmare of sometimes unknown scope.” I definitely find a lot of the locations in 76 more memorable than Fallout 3 or 4’s settlements and structures.

For an easier way to find Black Titanium at lower levels, look for the town called Welch in the area known as Ash Heap. In a Vending Machine in Welch, players can buy maps that point to a number of different mining sites. Though the maps cost 100 caps each, they point to areas where Black Titanium can be collected in bulk, generally appearing in groups of 10 or more Black Titanium each. It's a little pricey, but with these maps, completing Miner Miracles should be a breeze. By the way, you can buy cheap Fallout 76 Atoms from mmocs.com, where you can enjoy a 3% discount by using the code “ MMOCSVIP ”.

You may release a game you plan to fix and finish later to a certain extent, most major releases do that to some extent these days. But you do not send a game this broken and badly designed out into the wild, so much so that it lands itself a 50 metascore when you’re a studio that was previously tying worker bonuses to hitting an 85. Did Bethesda just think that their meme-like reputation of releasing buggy games would have everyone just laugh this off? Did they genuinely think they’d made a game that the majority of players would enjoy instead of just a scarce handful? I don’t understand.

This was one of the worst things they could have said. Laser weaponry and fusion cores can be found nearly anywhere in the wasteland, if you search hard enough, and they tend to last you a lifetime. Springs, screws, gears, and adhesive are seemingly everywhere, but if you build bases and upgrade your gear, you’ll burn through them constantly. My character serves as a scavenger for my group of four friends, and I spend a decent amount of time farming springs from battered clipboards; we still have a shortage of the fucking things.

The online confusion began last week when reports of PC refunds began to surface on Reddit. Players claimed Bethesda had sent their money back almost instantly once they'd sent a support ticket listing reasons for needing a refund. This seemed unusual, particularly given the terms and conditions for Fallout 76 on the Bethesda launcher state you cannot apply for a refund once the software has been used.

Responses

No responses yet. Be the first one!